DNF Reviews: Tarnished are the Stars & The Good Luck Girls – Why does YA Hate Me? (I’m Open to Suggestions)

Here’s a fun stat for you: I DNFed 5 books in the past month and a half, and four of them were YA SFF. And I’m pretty sure they’re at least 60% responsible for the reading slump I’m currently in.

Conclusion?

1) Recent YA SFF is just missing a lot of the stuff I crave. Also, I should be more selective about the books that I request, and for god’s sake, read some reviews beforehand.

or

2) I’ve been (VERY UNFAIRLY) cursed by the bookish gods and now I must travel to the heart of the Northern Canadian woods to capture a Wendigo and make an offering–

Yeah, clearly 2 is the way to go.

 

book cover (1)

(Stopping point: ~45%)

You say “steampunk” and “divided loyalties” and “cat and mouse” and “queer”; I say,  “Please–I offer you my first born.”

Well, I hope the bookish gods accept cancellations because Tarnished are the Stars is definitely not worth my first born. Or any of my born for that matter.

I always say that I can forgive poor worldbuildng if I’m able to connect with the characters. But there’s a limit to that. And my limit is this book. I found the writing to be so sparse of detail to the point where it felt like a slice-of-life contemporary than a sci-fi–heavy with dialogue and a vague sense of setting, which isn’t at all helped by how short each POV chapter is.

And a slice-of-life-esque worldbuilding is fine if the story itself is slice-of-life. This book? Nothing close to that. It’s a steampunk space opera with intrigue and a organics-versus-technology plotline, and therefore I want to see something more than Scene A – generic store, Scene B – generic mansion, and Scene C – generic field.

 

 


Now, this next book has the exact OPPOSITE problem. So at least my DNF reads were…varied? Yay?

The Good Luck Girls

(Stopping point: ~38%)

ME: So, it’s kind of weird how there are no characters in The Good Luck Girls…but at least the setting is neat!

*vague whisperings in brain cavity*

ME: Uh, what do you mean I’m looking at the characters?

Ah yes. The good old problem of “interesting worldbuilding, flat/invisible characters.” This is a more familiar territory for me.

Let’s get to the positive first: the worldbuilding and the general premise of the story is super fascinating. There are two groups of people who live in Arketta, dustbloods and fairbloods, and they’re more or less alike in appearance minus one little detail: dustbloods don’t cast shadows. And while fairbloods are offered privileges and opportunities, dustbloods are forced to live in indentured servitude–as prostitutes, for example, which is what the Good Luck Girls are.

The writing itself is really solid and descriptive, and all the little details about the setting are a nice touch. Also, copious descriptions of food equal a very happy Kathy.

All of this was negated by the characters. Holy friggin’ coconuts, the characters. You have this cool western setting–rich and dusty and unforgiving–and it’s somehow populated with characters with less personality and depth than the back of a cereal box. They were just…blank. And eerily so. I couldn’t find myself caring about any of them, or their predicament, and well, that was that.

 

flourish

So. What books should I pack for my Wendigo-hunting trip? And what’s your go-to remedy for bookish curses?

(I’ve been a BIT sleep-deprived this week–I don’t know if you can tell??)

Join The Hanged Man Street Team (#ScionsOfAtlantis) | A Tarot Sequence Promo Event

Street-Team-Banner3

☀️ SIGN UP HERE ☀️

 

Welcome to New Atlantis. An island once known as Nantucket, now a happily stitched-up landscape of skyscrapers and historical buildings stolen borrowed from all over the globe. A place where modern capitalism walks hand-in-hand with old world sensibilities. It’s also home to a kitchen sink of magical beings (if you imagine a kitchen sink the size of five football fields), including the most powerful and deadly entities on the planet: the Arcana.

Now, let’s zoom in on this map.

We come to an unremarkable little district at the heart of the city, and within that, an apartment nestled between a bookstore and a coffee shop. It’s a cute place, really. The perfect marriage of self-assured bohemia and “I have anxiety and decimal figures in my bank account.” Dilapidation with a wary, crooked charm.

Zoom in a bit more, a couple of floors up, to a painfully generic bedroom–and that, my friend, is where our story begins. That’s where you woke up this morning not knowing who you are.

No, not in an existential sense (though that will probably come later), but rather in the sense that you can’t recall one damn thing about yourself. Your name. Your age. Your past. Your lot in life. Nothing. If blankness had a shape, it’d look exactly like you.

So you did what any amnesiac in a fake RPG intro would do: hit the streets and start asking invasive questions to strangers.

Now here you are, going through the “Please Tell Me Your Life Story So I Can Figure Out Mine” routine–and it doesn’t take long for you to realize that something is very, very off. I mean, other than your memory situation.

New Atlantis is not unlike most big cities in the world, so there’s no shortage of billboards and posters and graffiti plastered across your view every dozen steps. That in itself isn’t strange. What is strange, however, is how those billboards and posters and graffiti are all saying the exact same thing:

Scion-wait.png

Yeah. Not creepy at all.

The words also come with a little symbol at the corner: sometimes it’s a SUN, other times a SCALE, a TOWER, or a SKULL.

And the strangest bit? It seems that you’re the only one who can see them. You confirm this when you grab a flyer and thrust it at a person nearby, asking, “Are you seeing this?” To which they reply, “Uh. Fifty percent off on large pizza?” before sidestepping away.

So you do a little digging–you’re getting to be quite good at that–and you begin to find out some things. You find out that the Arcana are the de facto rulers of New Atlantis. You find out that “Scions” are the children of such Arcana, all with varying degrees of entitlement and magical powers. You find out that those four symbols represent four of the major Arcana Thrones: Sun, Justice, Tower, and Death. You find out that what you’re seeing is essentially a recruitment call.

And this is what you find out about the Thrones:

 


(The following are overviews of Sun and Justice. To read about Tower and Death, hop on over to SIA’S BLOG! Tarot Meanings written by Sia; Court Details written by K.D.)

The Sun Throne

ET-MA-19-The-Sun.jpg

Image source: biddytarot.com

Modern Family Name: Saint John
Notable Members: Rune, Brand

Tarot Meaning:

In a tarot deck, the Sun card represents strength and fierce, bright joy. It is a sign that things are about to change for the better, and a reminder that you contain immense light and power within you. In fact, it often appears in a reading as a message that it is time for you to share your light with others—to step up to the plate and let the whole world see you blaze bright.

 

Court Details:

The former Lord Sun rose to power in the golden era of Atlantis, well before Atlantean society was revealed to the human world. His was a court of artists and musicians, scientists and philosophers. The Sun Throne has always been invested in research and discovery, in the exciting evolution of culture and civilization. To a certain extent, though, this was a facade. The Tower speaks of Lord Sun as an ally–which has always indicated to Rune that his father had a much deeper connection to the running of New Atlantis.

 

The Crusader Throne (Justice)

MA-11-justice.png

Modern Family Name: Saint Nicholas
Notable Members: Addam, Quinn

Tarot Meaning:

If you are currently seeking justice, the Justice card appearing in a reading means it will be served. But it can also mean that you must face justice—for your wrongdoings against others, or against yourself. Justice is fair and unbiased, and if you have worked for the greater good, the judgement will reflect that. If you haven’t, however, you will have to own up to your actions and face the consequences. Justice seeks out the truth, and that isn’t always an easy path—or one with simple and obvious answers. Bear that in mind if you are to walk Justice’s road.

 

Court Details:

Four major Arcana—sometimes called the Moral Certainties or Moral Virtues—have always formed a power bloc in Atlantean society, including Justice, Strength, Temperance and the Hermit. Justice is the traditional patron of judges; the others are patrons of religious leaders and the guarda. They are the Arcana who broker peace talks and ceasefires, and are heavily represented in the elected Convocation. Their carefully-constructed neutrality and piety translate well into the larger Corporate world; they are also among the most globally wealthy courts.

 


As you learn more and more, there’s a steady feeling rising in your bones-a primal radar we’re all born with–screaming that yes, this is what you are. Scion.

You can, of course, ignore it. That is absolutely a choice you can make. Life isn’t a reel of heroic action scenes, no matter what the stories say, and we’re not obligated to charge headfirst into every firefight that comes our way.

However.

There’s a rumbling along the fault lines of New Atlantean society, and it tells you of a storm brewing on the horizon. You don’t know when it’ll arrive, or how big it’ll be, but you know it will test everything you have.

And the glory? The glory will be monumental.

 

Sun. Justice. Tower. Death. They’re ready for you, Scion.

Are you?

 

flourish

Hello, hello, everyone!

Thank you so much for indulging that intro. I’ve been in a major RPG mood lately (well, more so than usual) and you can blame Disco Elysium for the inspiration (an incredible game, go play it). And you can thank Sia and K.D. for writing those wonderful Tarot and Court descriptions!

So. Street team.

The street team is part of The Hanged Man Promo Event that Sia, K.D, and I will be running from November to December. We’ll be officially announcing the whole affair on October 31st. I’ll explain then what inspired me to create the event and what I’d hoped to get out of it, and give you an overview of what you can expect in the next two months.

Now, the goal of any street team is to promote something through virtual and/or physical means. As a member, you’ll help spread the word about K.D. Edwards’ The Hanged Man, and the Tarot Sequence series in general, through reviews, word-of-mouth, social media posts, distribution of physical swag to friends and acquaintances, and whatever else you can think of.

It’ll be a small but firm commitment on your part, and there are going to be awesome rewards for your efforts, including:

  • special access to deleted scenes & behind-the-scenes content from the series
  • stickers of your Court emblem
  • a special letter of welcome from your Court’s head
  • AND MORE

You’ll “align” with one of four courts–Sun, Justice, Tower, and Death–and we’re hoping to make this into a fun competitive affair, where each team can earn points by completing tasks (which we’ll send and explain via email), with the winning team getting something special.

And I KNOW you all want to join the Sun Court and become a Saint John–I totally get that–but for the competition system to work, the team distribution has to be fairly equal (or at the very least, not overly skewed). So please consider Justice, Tower, and Death as well! They’re all exciting Courts, and each come with interesting, lovable characters.

Sign-up form will be open until November 5th, and the street team campaign will officially close in January 2020.

I’m so ridiculously excited for this, and for everything that’s to come later this week, and I hope you can join us!

 

☀️ SIGN UP HERE ☀️

 

Blog Tour Spotlight + Giveaway (US): Tarnished are the Stars | Feat. Character Art

zRF1gusQ.png

Tours, tours, tours! I forgot that I signed up for so many of them. I’m still on a semi-hiatus right now, but there are majorly exciting news coming in the next couple of weeks, and I CANNOT WAIT to tell you all about it. I’ll just say…if you’re a fan of a certain fantasy series that revolves around tarot cards, then you might want to keep your eyes peeled on the blog and on Twitter. *goofy grin*

Now, for the book in question! Tarnished are the Stars is an ownvoices steampunky scifi story (which is the best kind of story, really). It wasn’t for me, unfortunately, and that’s 100% a “ME” thing–I’ve been intensely picky about books lately, and if I can’t get into the writing style, I just can’t get into the story.

I’ll be posting a mini review after the tour ends, so in the meantime, enjoy this spotlight!

 

flourish

 

book cover (1).jpg

Author: Rosiee Thor
Release Date: October 15, 2019
Publisher: Scholastic Press
Genre(s): YA Science Fiction
Subject and Themes: LGBTQ+, Steampunk

 

A secret beats inside Anna Thatcher’s chest: an illegal clockwork heart. Anna works cog by cog — donning the moniker Technician — to supply black market medical technology to the sick and injured, against the Commissioner’s tyrannical laws.

Nathaniel Fremont, the Commissioner’s son, has never had to fear the law. Determined to earn his father’s respect, Nathaniel sets out to capture the Technician. But the more he learns about the outlaw, the more he questions whether his father’s elusive affection is worth chasing at all.

Their game of cat and mouse takes an abrupt turn when Eliza, a skilled assassin and spy, arrives. Her mission is to learn the Commissioner’s secrets at any cost — even if it means betraying her own heart.

When these uneasy allies discover the most dangerous secret of all, they must work together despite their differences and put an end to a deadly epidemic — before the Commissioner ends them first.

 

 

About the Author

2IVnvAPw.jpeg
 
Rosiee Thor began her career as a storyteller by demanding that her mother listen as Rosiee told bedtime stories instead of the other way around. She lives in Oregon with a dog, two cats, and four complete sets of Harry Potter, which she loves so much, she once moved her mattress into the closet and slept there until she came out as queer.

 

 

 

Character Art

 

tarnished

Left to right: Anna, Eliza, Nathaniel

 

tranished.png

The Commissioner, Thatcher

 

Giveaway

The giveaway is open to U.S. residents only. Ends October 29th. Enter HERE.

 

 

Tour Schedule

You can check out the rest of the tour stops HERE.

 

Guest Post (The Vine Witch): A History of Witches in France | Feat. Giveaway (US)

cWIIJEhw

I’m so excited to bring you this (belated) guest post today about the history of witches in France, written by author Luanne G. Smith whose debut was released recently on October 1st–a story about witches, revenge, French vineyards, and vine magic (which sounds like the coolest thing). The book is giving me seductive looks from my TBR pile right now, so I’m hoping to get to it soon.

Hope you enjoy this little piece! (I definitely did)

flourish

 

It’s always an interesting question to consider the witch trials of the past. One thing that’s always struck me as a rather obvious notion is that none of the people executed for sorcery, in France or elsewhere, were actually witches. They were invariably mortal men and women (and France was less gender-biased in the persecution of “witches” than other nations) who perhaps dabbled in herbs and fortunetelling on the side, but that was fairly common stuff in certain circles. France, in particular, has had a reputation for being obsessed with the occult for centuries, going back to the days of Louis XIV and the Affair of the Poisons. If you’ve never heard about Catherine Deshayes Monvoison, aka La Voisin, and the things she was up to, you’re in for a ghastly read. But in general, the accusations of witchcraft against citizens often served more than merely appeasing moral righteousness and saving the world from the Devil’s influence. They were often acts of retaliation or outright villainy by aggrieved neighbors who used the law to disguise their motives. I mean, if you think about it, a real witch ought to have had the cunning and skill to escape a hapless group of pitchfork-wielding mortals.

From what I was able to discern, the last person to be burned for the crime of witchcraft in France occurred in 1745. That’s why, in The Vine Witch, the laws for witches are referred to as the 1745 Covenants. I was playing off the premise that mortals and witches were forced to come together as a matter of necessity in that year. Too many mortals had been executed as witches, and too many witches had been getting away with harming mortals. So, the two sides drew up the Covenant Law agreements and each, from then on out, left the other alone. Mostly. Which is my interpretation for why there’s no more mention of witches being executed in the public record after that date. Doesn’t mean witches went away. Or mortals stopped being afraid of witches and their powers. Or that everyone obeyed the laws. After all, stories aren’t written about the law-abiders.

 

flourish

About the Book

BOOK COVER.jpg


The Vine Witch (Vine Witch #1)

Author: Luanne G. Smith
Publisher: 47North
Release Date: October 1, 2019
Genre(s): YA Fantasy, Historical Fiction

 photo addtogoodreadssmall_zpsa2a6cf28.png photo B6096376-6C81-4465-8935-CE890C777EB9-1855-000001A1E900B890_zps5affbed6.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

About the Author

o425xZoQ.jpeg

Luanne G. Smith is the author of THE VINE WITCH, a fantasy novel about witches, wine, and revenge set in early 20th century France, and the forthcoming second book in the series, THE GLAMOURIST. She’s lucky enough to live in Colorado at the base of the beautiful Rocky Mountains, where she enjoys reading, gardening, hiking, a glass of wine at the end of the day, and finding the magic in everyday life.

 

 

Giveaway (US Only)

One finished copy of The Vine Witch is up for grabs! ENTER HERE

 

Tour Schedule

You can go check out the other stops on the tour HERE!

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Traits I Like in Characters (Sorted by Character Class/Type)

TTT-NEW

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by  The Artsy Reader Girl. This week’s topic is “Traits I Like in Characters,” but I decided to get a little more specific, because honestly, there are a LOT of traits that I like in characters.

And a couple of years ago I realized that there are specific trait + character class combinations that I like more than others. And traits that I usually find annoying in one class I love in another. For example–thieves (rogues) and sarcasm? Been there done that. But sarcasm in, say…a medic type of character? Much more interesting.

So these are some of my favourite traits for specific character classes/types.

 


🔪 Rogues 🔪

 

Pirate Captains (or any leader figures, really):

1. Courteousness

I have a **thing** with people–er, characters–who have power and status and aren’t good, per se, but are sticklers about manners and respecting personal boundaries.

Just because you rob innocents out in the sea and commit a murder or two or a dozen every now and then, doesn’t mean you have to be rude about it.

 

2. Casual, Confident Confidence

This is actually a trait I’m meh about in assassins and thieves. But give me a feathered hat, a parrot, and a show of authority and POOF, magic happens, I guess.

These characters are capable and dangerous–cross them and they’ll run you through with a knife without a hitch in their moral compass–and everyone knows it, including themselves. But the confidence isn’t a forced act they have to put on. It’s like a second skin for them, and they know exactly when to dial it down and when to blast it in full-force. That awareness and control is a sexy, sexy thing.

 

tumblr_nicyyjl6jV1qixu5go1_250-6951

maltair.tumblr.com

Favourite Example(s):

– Isabela (aka my video game wife) from Dragon Age 2

 

Assassins:

1. Kindness and Empathy

Because I’m a contrarian. And I fall hard for kindness in any type of character.

But genuine kindness in someone whose job is anything but kind–someone who deals out cold, calculated death on a regular basis–is something that’s especially attractive and fascinating to me. The fact that they’re able to retain their humanity when there’s so much blood on their hands is nothing short of incredible.

 

assassin.png

Favourite Example(s):

FitzChivalry (Realm of the Elderings series by Robin Hobb)
Girton (The Blood of Assassins series by R.J. Barker)

 

2. Spiritual

Nothing hotter than an assassin who debates religious philosophy with you and says a nice prayer for your passing after they stick a knife between your ribs, eh?

(I’m 100% serious here)

 

Thane_Character_Box

Favourite Example(s):

Thane Krios (Mass Effect 2 & 3)

 


🔮 Magic Users 🔮

 

Witches and Wizards:

1. Sarcastic

This is how I always want my sarcasm. Served with a big bowl of fireballs.

See, being a spellcaster is hard life, folks. You’re the easiest target in battle. You’re more often than not shoved into the role of a sidekick (when you’re not being burned at the stake, that is). And who gets most of the credit and glory at the end of the day? Yeah. The guy with the pointy stick.

So a wizardy or witchy type of character with a sarcastic, I’ve-had-enough-of-this-shit attitude is…cathartic? Satisfying? Something along those lines.

 

2. Brassy with Low Tolerance for Idiots

See above? I especially love female witches/wizards who are like this, because we can never have enough loud, outspoken women in fiction.

 

Penny_Dreadful_2x03_002

Favourite example(s):

– Joan Clayton (Penny Dreadful)

 

Seers/Prophets:

3. Childlike Wonder

I look at seerhood in most stories as more of a curse than a gift. And as with assassins, I think it’d be incredibly difficult to retain your humanity (or sanity) in this particular line of work. So, to me, a seer who possesses a kind of bright-eyed innocence, even with the weight of millions and millions of lives bearing down on them, is someone to be treasured.

 

9781633884922_528c2

Favourite example(s):

Quinn (The Tarot Sequence series by K.D. Edwards)

 


⚔️ Warrior/Fighter ⚔️

1. Shy/Introverted

This isn’t a character I come across all too often, and I’d love to see that remedied. Because people who enjoy charging into the thick of a fight, blades and guns drawn, don’t necessarily have to be extroverts. They may be anxious about socializing and quiet in a crowded room, which is perfectly fine and should be more normalized, in my opinion.

 


🤷 Normal People 🤷

 

Public Servants:

1. Unwavering Moral Conviction

Listen, I love vigilantes and anti-heroes as much as the next person. Characters who “break bad” because they believe society is rigged, and flirting with the dark side is the only way to achieve justice in the long run. They make for fantastic stories.

But I love the flip side of it even more: public servants who stay within the limits of the law because they believe, with every ounce of their being, that you can’t right wrongs with more wrongs. These characters never waver in their convictions, even when those around them–people they love and trust–are choosing to discard the law and societal order for personal gain. Or if they do waver, if they end up going through moments of crisis, they come out on the other side even stronger.

I may not always agree with them, but I find these characters admirable regardless.

 

Akane-Tsunemori-akane-tsunemori-39841098-1366-768

Psycho-Pass

Favourite Example(s):

Akane Tsunemori (Psycho-Pass)
Mulagesh (The City of Blades by Robert Bennett Jackson)

 

flourish

Sooooo, if there are any cocky pirate captains and good-hearted assassins reading this…*cough* My DMs are open

Blog Tour Spotlight + Giveaway (INTL): The Good Luck Girls by Charlotte Nicole Davis

The Good Luck Girls Tour Banner.jpg

The Good Luck Girls.JPG

 

Title: The Good Luck Girls
Author: Charlotte Nicole Davis
Publisher: Tor Teen
Release Date: October 1st 2019
Genre(s): YA Fantasy
Subjects and Themes: Western, LGBTQIAP+
Page Count: 352 (hardback)

    

 

 

 

 

 

Synopsis

Westworld meets The Handmaid’s Tale in this stunning fantasy adventure from debut author Charlotte Nicole Davis.

Aster, the protector
Violet, the favorite
Tansy, the medic
Mallow, the fighter
Clementine, the catalyst

The country of Arketta calls them Good Luck Girls–they know their luck is anything but. Sold to a “welcome house” as children and branded with cursed markings. Trapped in a life they would never have chosen.

When Clementine accidentally murders a man, the girls risk a dangerous escape and harrowing journey to find freedom, justice, and revenge in a country that wants them to have none of those things. Pursued by Arketta’s most vicious and powerful forces, both human and inhuman, their only hope lies in a bedtime story passed from one Good Luck Girl to another, a story that only the youngest or most desperate would ever believe.

It’s going to take more than luck for them all to survive.

 

 

flourish

 

About the Author

Charlotte Nicole Davis.JPG


Charlotte Nicole Davis
is the author of The Good Luck Girls, a young adult fantasy novel releasing in Fall 2019 with Tor Teen. A graduate of The New School’s Writing for Children MFA program, Charlotte loves comic book movies and books with maps in the front. She currently lives in Brooklyn with a cat with a crooked tail.

Website | Twitter | Instagram | Goodreads

 

 

 

 

Giveaway

The giveaway is open internationally (must be +13 to enter), and there will be 5 winners selected. Ends October 21st. ENTER HERE

 

 

Tour Schedule

WEEK ONE
SEPTEMBER 30th MONDAY JeanBookNerd GUEST POST
OCTOBER 1st TUESDAY Twirling Book Princess EXCERPT
OCTOBER 2nd WEDNESDAY A Court of Coffee and Books REVIEW
OCTOBER 2nd WEDNESDAY Kait Plus Books EXCERPT
OCTOBER 3rd THURSDAY Bibliobibuli YA GUEST POST
OCTOBER 4th FRIDAY Novel Lives REVIEW
OCTOBER 4th FRIDAY Movies, Shows, & Books EXCERPT

 

WEEK TWO
OCTOBER 7th MONDAY BookHounds YA REVIEW
OCTOBER 8th TUESDAY Lisa Loves Literature REVIEW
OCTOBER 8th TUESDAY Pages Below the Vaulted Sky REVIEW
OCTOBER 9th WEDNESDAY Casia’s Corner REVIEW
OCTOBER 10th THURSDAY Lauren’s Bookshelf REVIEW
OCTOBER 10th THURSDAY Starlight Reads REVIEW
OCTOBER 11th FRIDAY Nay’s Pink Bookshelf REVIEW

Review: The Infinite Noise – Fine with a Dash of Soft & Sweet and a Landing that Doesn’t Stick

91SnBiRP3wL.jpg

Title: The Infinite Noise
Author: Lauren Shippen
Publisher: TorTeen
Release Date: September 24th 2019
Genre(s): YA Sci-Fi
Subjects and Themes: LGBTQIAP+, Mental Health, Superpowers
Page Count: 336 (hardback)

Rating: 6.0/10

 photo addtogoodreadssmall_zpsa2a6cf28.png photo B6096376-6C81-4465-8935-CE890C777EB9-1855-000001A1E900B890_zps5affbed6.jpg

 

 

 

 

Caleb Michaels is a sixteen-year-old champion running back. Other than that his life is pretty normal. But when Caleb starts experiencing mood swings that are out of the ordinary for even a teenager, his life moves beyond “typical.”

Caleb is an Atypical, an individual with enhanced abilities. Which sounds pretty cool except Caleb’s ability is extreme empathy―he feels the emotions of everyone around him. Being an empath in high school would be hard enough, but Caleb’s life becomes even more complicated when he keeps getting pulled into the emotional orbit of one of his classmates, Adam. Adam’s feelings are big and all-consuming, but they fit together with Caleb’s feelings in a way that he can’t quite understand.

Caleb’s therapist, Dr. Bright, encourages Caleb to explore this connection by befriending Adam. As he and Adam grow closer, Caleb learns more about his ability, himself, his therapist―who seems to know a lot more than she lets on―and just how dangerous being an Atypical can be.

flourish

First of all, if you haven’t check out the The Bright Sessions podcast, please please please do so. From a bird’s eye view, it’s a story about superpowered people attending therapy, but really it’s so much more than that.

Second of all, I highly, highly recommend listening to the audiobook for this (narrated by the VA’s who play Caleb and Adam in the podcast). That might be presumptuous, seeing as how I haven’t even tried the audiobook version yet, but…. *whispering* Shippen’s prose just isn’t as engaging in print form as it is in audio form (TBS fans can skewer me for that). I mean, it’s fine–very casual and conversational, which fits her teenage characters–but it’s also kind of plain, and I had a hard time differentiating between Caleb and Adam’s narration. And a multi first-person POV book in which the narrators blend together is Kiss of Death territory for me.

Well, at least it would be if it weren’t for the fact that (1) this is a Bright Sessions story, and (2) this is a Bright Sessions story. And TBS at its core has always been about the power of empathy and human connections, which remains very true in this adaptation.

Caleb is the jockish empath with the heart of gold, kind in a way that obliterates the typical jockish stereotype (I would go to war for him), and Adam is the quiet bookish boy who’s dealing with more mundane but still very real demons of his own. It was nice to see a more in-depth look at their relationship that we don’t get in the podcast. Shippen nails the messiness of being a teenager, psychic or otherwise, and her descriptions of anxiety and depression are some of the best I’ve seen.

It’s not dark, it’s…the absence of light. Like some sort of void. It doesn’t weigh down on me, suffocate me. It’s empty–just total nothingness. But it’s sucking me in and I feel like if I go inside of it I’ll stop existing entirely, and that scares me but at the same time it would be a relief. 

The Infinite Noise talks about feelings–their shape, their depth, their colour–probably more than any other speculative book I’ve read. And I so, so appreciate that, not only because rifling through emotions and assigning imagery to them is something I always do (because that makes it easier for me to process them), but also because it goes such a long way towards normalizing vulnerable masculinity in media.

So the majority of the story is slow-burn relationship building with bits of sci-fi elements, which is good. The last 10% or so is really where things fall apart for me. And most of that has to do with the structure of the podcast, and how some of it doesn’t translate to a two-POV book environment. Sequences that are interesting and well-paced in the podcast come across as incredibly abrupt and jarring here, and…I don’t know, I just think the book could have benefited from an extra 40-50 pages to flesh things out.

Overall, it’s a bit of a mixed bag. It was nice to revisit these characters in novel form, but I don’t think if it brought anything majorly new and exciting to the table that the podcast didn’t. That being said, I…still recommend checking it out. I think it’s a fine intro to the TBS universe for newcomers, and the way I see it, any story that champions kindness and empathy is worth at least a quick browse.

 

flourish
Review copy provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review